Tuesday, April 16, 2024

Can Psoriasis Lead To Arthritis

Can I Get Financial Support

Preventing Anxiety and Depression when Living with Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

Many people worry about what happens if they cannot work or need financial help because of the effects of psoriatic arthritis. Fortunately for many, with good therapy and management the condition can be controlled and allow for a full and active working life. But if you do find that even for a short period of time you are likely to need help, visit the national government websites online. If it is easier, contact your local government or council office, where you should be directed to the appropriate resource and information.

Always consult your doctor or healthcare provider.

This article is adapted from the What is Psoriatic Arthritis? leaflet.

Other leaflets are also available to or order FREE from our shop and include the following:

  • About Us
  • Occupational Therapy and Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Physiotherapy and Exercise: Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Psoriasis and Sensitive Areas
  • Psoriatic Arthritis – Did you know?
  • Psoriatic Arthritis – When to treat?
  • Psoriatic Fatigue
  • Treatments for Psoriasis: An overview
  • Treatments for Psoriatic Arthritis: An overview
  • What is Psoriasis?

How Is It Diagnosed

Your doctor will diagnose psoriatic arthritis from your symptoms and a physical examination. Your skin will be examined for signs of psoriasis, if you have not been diagnosed with this already. There is no specific test for psoriatic arthritis. However your doctor may order blood tests for inflammation, such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate test. Blood tests may also help to rule out other types of arthritis. If your doctor suspects you have psoriatic arthritis you should be referred to a rheumatologist, a doctor who specialises in arthritis.

> > > Best Psoriasis Cure Available

3. To help safeguard the skin, the immune system release chemicals that can cause nerves to itch and blood vessels to dilate to prepare the skin for a sudden rush of immune cells

4. When the immune cells arrive at the scene, most work to kill off the pathogens causing the distress, but a few capture some of the invaders and take them back to the heart of the immune system, where other soldier cells are produced in a way to recognize and attack the invading cells on contact

5. Inflammation is the bodys way of opening blood vessels to allow more soldier cells to rush to the battlefield.

While this entire process is completely normal, people with psoriasis tend to overproduce these soldier cells when the body feels threatened. This overabundance of killer immune cells can actually be dangerous to the skin since they begin to attack good cells along with the bad ones.

While it is great to finally understand the impact an improperly working immune system can have on your skin and cause psoriasis more research is needed to pinpoint the exact cause for the over-firing of the cell messages. Can Psoriasis Lead to Arthritis

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Treatment For Psoriatic Arthritis

Treatment for psoriatic arthritis aims to:

  • relieve symptoms
  • slow the condition’s progression
  • improve quality of life

This usually involves trying a number of different medicines, some of which can also treat the psoriasis. If possible, you should take 1 medicine to treat both your psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

The main medicines used to treat psoriatic arthritis are:

  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • biological therapies

How Will Psoriatic Arthritis Affect Me

Myths About Psoriatic Arthritis

The effects of psoriatic arthritis can vary a great deal between different people. This makes it difficult to offer advice on what you should expect.

Psoriatic arthritis can cause long-term damage to joints, bones and other tissue in the body, especially if it isnt treated.

Starting the right treatment as soon as possible will give you the best chance of keeping your arthritis under control and minimise damage to your body allowing you to lead a full and active life with psoriatic arthritis.

You dont need to face arthritis alone. If you need support or advice, call our Helpline today on . Our advisors can give you expert information and advice about arthritis and can offer support whenever you need it most.

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What You Need To Know About Psoriasis Can Psoriasis Lead To Psoriatic Arthritis

Is Your Stomach to Blame?

Who would have thought that a severe psoriasis outbreak could start because of something going wrong inside of your stomach and intestines? Yet, new research developed by psoriasis expert Edgard Cayce shows a distinct link between a leaky gut and a scaly psoriatic episode. According to Cayce, the primary source of psoriasis can be found in the intestinal tract, where toxins are leached into the body. This causes the immune system to react by thickening the skin. At the same time, the skin tries to purge the toxins through its layers, which can cause scabs and sores to form.

Could Arthritis Be the Cuplrit?

The intestines arent the only link to psoriasis found by researchers arthritis seems to also contribute to it. As many as one-third of all psoriasis patients eventually develop some form of psoriatic arthritis. Unlike normal forms of arthritis, those with psoriatic arthritis do not exhibit a rheumatoid factor when their blood is tested. This indicates that the arthritic condition comes solely from either the psoriasis itself or the underlying cause of the skin affliction.

Could a Virus Be the Cause?

Arthritis has been linked to certain virus and so have other auto-immune disorders. This leads some researchers to think that psoriasis too may start with a virus, which is what kicks the immune system into overdrive.

How Successful Are The Treatments

Anti-inflammatory drugs can help to reduce pain, swelling and stiffness. Unfortunately, however, they can make skin symptoms worse in some people. Steroid injections to joints may give relief. Disease-modifying drugs such as methotrexate can damp down both skin and joint symptoms, as can targeted biologic agents.

In some cases, surgery to remove a thickened synovial membrane , realign a joint or to fuse a joint may stop pain which results from movement.

Sometimes it is possible to remove the painful end of a bone .

Remember: All treatments may have unwanted side effects or require special precautions . Always make sure you have all the information before embarking on any course of therapy this includes reading the patient information leaflets provided with your medicines.

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What Is Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a type of arthritis linked with psoriasis, a chronic skin andnail disease. Psoriasis causes red, scaly rashes and thick, pitted fingernails.Psoriatic arthritis is similar to rheumatoid arthritis in symptoms and jointswelling . But it tends to affect fewer joints than RA. And it does notmake the typical RA antibodies. The arthritis of psoriatic arthritis comes in 5forms:

  • Arthritis that affects the small joints in the fingers, toes, or both
  • Asymmetrical arthritis of the joints in the hands and feet
  • Symmetrical polyarthritis, which is similar to RA
  • Arthritis mutilans, a rare type of arthritis that destroys and deforms joints
  • Psoriatic spondylitis, arthritis of the lower back and the spine

Six Symptoms You Shouldnt Ignore

Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis and Weight

The symptoms of psoriatic arthritis can vary in severity, from person to person and can even come and go . Here are six symptoms you should watch out for.

1. Its hard to move in the morning

Psoriatic arthritis can make getting up in the morning a challenge, especially after you havent moved around for a while. It can cause stiffness and pain in one or more joints, from your toes to your fingers. It can even cause pain and swelling in the tendons and surrounding structures that connect to your bone, a condition called enthesitis.

2. Your fingers look like warm sausages

About 30 to 50 percent of patients with psoriatic arthritis will experience the symptoms of dactylitis, or extreme swelling in their fingers and toes, Dr. Aquino said. This is when the entire fingers and toes swell to resemble sausages.

You may notice your swollen joints feel warm to the touch because inflammation and swelling cause heat.

3. You have lower back pain

When you think of psoriatic arthritis, you typically think about skin symptoms, but many people experience lower back pain as well. About 20 percent of those with psoriatic arthritis will develop a subtype called spinal involvement or psoriatic spondylitis, which may result in pain and stiffness in the back and hips, Dr. Aquino said.

4. Your nails have grooves and ridges
5. You experience eye problems
6. Youre always tired

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What To Do About Your Symptoms

If youre experiencing any of the symptoms above and have psoriasis, seek help from your health care provider to consider a possible evaluation with a rheumatologist. Getting treatment early can help you avoid further joint damage and pain.

To find a Banner Health specialist near you, visit bannerhealth.com.

Psoriatic Arthritis Can Potentially Lead To Permanent Deformity And Disability

4 minute read

When a joint pain or joint tenderness exhibits, it might be solely mistaken for arthritis a common condition that causes pain and inflammation in the joints. In fact, if swollen or tender joints are present with scaly skin patches, psoriatic arthritis might be indicated. If it is left untreated, some patients with psoriatic arthritis can further develop a severe and disabling form of arthritis. Over time, arthritis destroys the small bones, leading to permanent deformity and disability.

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Can Psoriasis Lead To Arthritis

Can you think of a disease that ranks as high as cancer in terms of its impact on the patients quality of life? The answer is psoriasis. It is an autoimmune disorder that results in the flaking off of skin faster than normal, giving rise to eruptions all over the body. These eruptions often itch and ooze.

Watching your skin start to look scaly and covered with red patches can be an ultimate nightmare. But in reality, is it just the skin that gets affected? Lets find out.

According to the International Federation of Psoriasis Associations , over 125 million people have some form of psoriasis skin disease worldwide. It commonly affects individuals between 15 to 35 years of age, with men being affected twice as much as women. Psoriasis significantly impairs the quality of life of the patients and their families resulting in physical, emotional, and social burdens.

The cause of psoriasis is the rapid build-up of skin cells that results in scaly skin. In most cases, people inherit genes that make them more likely to develop psoriasis. Did you know that according to the National Psoriasis Foundation , approximately 2% to 3% of people with the gene develop the condition?

Other psoriasis symptoms apart from redness, inflammation, and scaling include:

  • dry skin that may crack and start to bleed
  • soreness around the patch
  • whitish-silver scales or plaques on the red patches
  • itching and burning sensations around affected areas
  • pitted and thick nails

What Causes Psoriasis And Psoriatic Arthritis

Can Psoriasis Spread By Irritating The Affected Areas?

The symptoms of both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis arise when the bodys immune system malfunctions, leading to inflammation.

In psoriasis, the faulty reaction causes skin cells to grow too fast, promoting a buildup of skin cells on the surface. These cells appear as a scaly rash.

In psoriatic arthritis, the inflammation affects the joints. Permanent damage can result if the person does not seek treatment.

Doctors do not yet know the exact causes of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, they do know that genetics contribute to both conditions.

An estimated 1 out of 3 people with psoriasis say that they have a family member with psoriasis. Also, around 40 percent of people with psoriatic arthritis have a family member with psoriatic disease.

Still, many people have genes for psoriatic disease and never develop it. To develop psoriatic disease, a person must have the specific genes for it, as well as a trigger that activates it.

Possible triggers for psoriatic disease include:

  • an infection, such as strep throat or a cold
  • use of tobacco or smoking
  • heavy alcohol use

These triggers may bring on psoriasis, and they can also cause flares. Flares are cycles during which symptoms become worse. Triggers vary from person to person and may change over time.

Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis symptoms often come and go in cycles. They may get worse during a flare and then improve. Symptoms may also move around, affecting different areas of the body at different times.

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Treatments For The Arthritis

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

NSAIDs, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, can reduce pain, but they might not be enough to treat symptoms of psoriatic arthritis for everyone.

Some people find that NSAIDs work well at first but become less effective after afew weeks. If this happens, itmight help to try a different NSAID.

There are about 20 different NSAIDs available, including ibuprofen, etoricoxib, etodolac and naproxen.

Like all drugs, NSAIDs can have side effects. Your doctor will reduce the risk ofthese, by prescribing the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible period of time.

NSAIDs can sometimes cause digestive problems, such as stomach upsets, indigestion or damage to the lining of the stomach. You may also be prescribed a drug called a proton pump inhibitor , such as omeprazole or lansoprazole, to help protect the stomach.

For some people, NSAIDs can increase the risk of heart attacks or strokes. Although this increased risk is small, your doctor will be cautious about prescribing NSAIDs ifthere are other factors that may increase your overall risk, for example, smoking, circulation problems, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes.

Some people have found that taking NSAIDs made their psoriasis worse. Tell your doctor if this happens to you.

Steroid treatment

Steroid injections into a joint can reduce pain and swelling, but the effects do wear off after a few months.

Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

Classification Of Psoriatic Arthritis

The simple and highly specific Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis , developed by a large international study group, has a sensitivity and specificity of 98.7% and 91.4%, respectively. The criteria consist of established inflammatory articular disease with at least 3 points from the following features:

  • Current psoriasis
  • A history of psoriasis
  • A family history of psoriasis
  • Dactylitis
  • Juxta-articular new-bone formation
  • RF negativity
  • Nail dystrophy

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How Can I Help My Child Live With Psoriatic Arthritis

Help your child manage his or her symptoms by sticking to the treatment plan. This includes getting enough sleep. Encourage exercise and physical therapy and find ways to make it fun. Work with your child’s school to make sure your child has help as needed. Work with other caregivers to help your child take part as much possible in school, social, and physical activities. Your child may also qualify for special help under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. You can also help your child find a support group to be around with other children with pediatric arthritis.

Treatments For Your Skin

Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis and Weight

If your psoriasis is affecting your quality of life, or your treatment is not working, you may be referred to a dermatologist.

There are a number of treatment options for psoriasis.

Ointments, creams, and gels that can be applied to the skin include:

  • ointments made from a medicine called dithranol
  • steroid-based creams and lotions
  • vitamin D-like ointments such ascalcipotriol and tacalcitol
  • vitamin A-like gels such astazarotene
  • salicylic acid
  • tar-based ointments.

For more information about the benefits and disadvantages of any of these talk to your GP, dermatologist, or pharmacist.

If the creams and ointments dont help, your doctor may suggest light therapy, also known as phototherapy. This involves being exposed to short spells of strong ultraviolet light in hospital.

Once this treatment has started, youll need to have it regularly and stick to the appointments youve been given, for it to be successful. This treatment is not suitable for people at high risk of skin cancer or for children. For some people, this treatment can make their psoriasis worse.

Retinoid tablets, such as acitretin, are made from substances related to vitamin A. These can be useful if your psoriasis isnt responding to other treatments. However, they can cause dry skin and you may not be able to take them if you have diabetes.

Some DMARDs used for psoriatic arthritis will also help with psoriasis.

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How To Get The Right Arthritis Diagnosis

There is no single test for psoriatic arthritis, says Azar. Along with a physical exam, youll likely need a series of both imaging procedures and blood tests for a diagnosis, and to rule out other forms of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout.

Theres no one test to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis either, but, as with PsA, blood tests are part of the workup. The presence of autoantibodies in the bloodstream, either rheumatoid factor or cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, will suggest an RA diagnosis. These antibodies tend to be less typical in people with psoriatic arthritis, according to an article published in Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Diseases in August 2018.

As part of the physical exam, the doctor will closely evaluate the affected joints. RA involves the joints in a symmetrical fashion, and often, when rheumatoid factor is very high, there may be nodules under the skin, Azar says. According to the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, 20 percent of patients with RA develop these firm lumps.

Psoriatic arthritis, on the other hand, can reveal itself in a variety of ways, affecting a large joint or a single small finger joint of the hand, says Azar.

Another notable difference between the two diseases is bone involvement. RA is characterized by bone loss or erosion near the joint, while PsA is marked by both bone erosion and new bone formation, Azar says. An X-ray or other imaging method can help reveal whats going on.

Nail Psoriasis Common Changes

Common changes to the nails that occur in nail psoriasis include:

  • Pitting of the nails: the nails begin to look like the surface of a thimble
  • Onycholysis: the nail becomes detached from the underlying nail bed and a gap develops under the nail
  • Subungual hyperkeratosis: chalky substance accumulates underneath the nail and the nail becomes raised and tender when touched
  • Discoloration: nail may become a yellowish-brown
  • Onychomycosis: a fungal infection that results in thickening of the nail and needs to be treated with antifungals

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